Council Promotes Tourism in Quirindi and Liverpool Plains Shire

There are so many great things about the Quirindi region. Our friendly community, our ever-changing calendar of special events, sporting comps and recreational activities, the beautiful natural landscape surrounding us throughout the Liverpool Plains region, flourishing agricultural industries (including the colourful mosaic of farms growing sunflowers, sorghum, canola, maize, lucerne and wheat), top-notch schools and a fantastic, family-friendly lifestyle here in rural New South Wales. Quirindi and the surrounding villages of Werris Creek, Willow Tree, Wallabadah and Currabubula have fascinating Indigenous Australian and early European pioneering history and culture. There are heaps of great places to stay, welcoming local pubs, cafes and restaurants and so many things to do with the whole family, for locals and visitors alike.

The Liverpool Plains Shire Council agree, and they want to strongly promote our region for all it has to offer to tourists. A growing tourism industry in the area will allow us to share this lovely pocket of rural Australia with visitors, boosting the economy of the area and supporting local industry and small businesses. Special events (such as the upcoming inaugural Who’d A Thought It Music Festival) and attractions bring visitors to the region and in turn, increased visitor numbers help local festivals and other events to grow and improve year by year. The Council recently met to present reports highlighting the efforts of the Visitor Information Centres and the council’s Economic Development Committee in promoting tourism and planning for the future.

Councillor Andrew Hope pointed out the importance of campers and the “grey nomad” market – retired couples and singles travelling in caravans and motorhomes – to the tourism industry in country towns like Quirindi. Thousands of “Quirindi Country Drives” and “Top Attractions” brochures were given out at camping and caravanning shows this year in Sydney, Maitland and Brisbane. The Council also ran an info stand at the Medieval Fayre & City Parade in Quirindi’s sister city of Blacktown.

A great initiative celebrated by the Council was “The Kamilaroi – a Highway and People” project, which began installation earlier this year at the Visitor Information Centre in Willow Tree. The project is being funded by the Federal Office of Heritage and supervised by the local Aboriginal Advisory Committee. The Kamilaroi is the only highway in Australia named after an aboriginal nation and runs through the traditional land of the Gomeroi people. The project aims to educate locals and tourists about the fascinating heritage of the traditional owners of the Kamilaroi Country, and includes interpretive panels in both English and the Gomeroi language. A feature of the permanent exhibition is the Brewarrina Fish Traps, which are considered to be one of the oldest man-made objects in the world. Promotion for the Kamilaroi project has begun in key local tourism markets including Hunter Valley and other regions bordering Liverpool Plains Shire.

We’ve posted about the enthusiasm for equestrian sports in Quirindi before, and the excellent facilities that exist for those sports in the area. The Council thinks these have great potential for visitors – they are supporting the Quirindi Jockey Club for a “Saddle Up Sunday” event in 2015 (keep an eye out for more details in the coming months!) and have acknowledged the many people who visit Quirindi for events held at the racecourse and showgrounds – monthly Race Days, polo carnivals, showjumping events and the annual Spring Show in September.

As a local business, we’re proud sponsors of the Quirindi Spring Show and we love seeing our region promoted as a great place to visit. Are you considering renting, buying or selling property in the Quirindi area? Come and have a chat to Luke and the friendly team at Ray White Quirindi!