Quirindi Men’s Shed contributes to major art project

Quirindi Men’s Shed contributes to major art project

Artist and researcher Robbie van Hemert will debut her exhibition “The Majestic Food Plains: A Land Biography” at the National Trust Centre at Observatory Hill in Sydney from 28 March to 7 April 2015. The show will be the culmination of over 2 years work between the artist and farmers, community members and environmental scientists from the Liverpool Plains and wider New South Wales. Robbie van Hemert’s work aims to form a meaningful connection between Australians and our food supply – in this case, the region of the Liverpool Plains “food bowl”, an important area of rural primary producers. The Majestic Food Plains show will also feature the launch of a project called The Food Bowl Connection, a primary school education tool which aims to teach metropolitan kids and their families where their food comes from, the use of the land and the connection between farmers and all Australians.

Robbie’s beautiful artwork, including macro watercolours and detailed pencil work, will be exhibited alongside her carefully curated specimens of grains, herbs and crops in a sub-collection called “Grains of the Plains”. The herbarium collection will be shown in six handmade display cabinets which have been crafted from local timber by the men at Quirindi Men’s Shed and given to the artist as a donation. Robbie told the Quirindi Advocate that she is amazed by the generosity and skill of the men, and that the cabinets will allow her to take a true part of Quirindi and the Liverpool Plains region to the Sydney exhibition.

The Quirindi Men’s Shed is based at the Rural Heritage Village, 3km west of Quirindi on the Kamilaroi Highway. The group meets on Thursdays, and offers a great opportunity for locals to get together, learn and share info, work on projects or simply spend time and have a cuppa in the company of likeminded people. There are Men’s Sheds all over Australia which sprung from the knowledge that men, particularly older retired men, are less likely to take care of their own health and general wellbeing, including maintaining their social lives. Community Men’s Sheds bring people together who may otherwise have never met, offering a no-pressure and relaxed but still busy environment. Find out more here. The Quirindi Men’s Shed is particularly active, having won a $3000 grant earlier this year to purchase woodworking tools and equipment.

If you’re looking to buy, sell or rent property in the regional centre of Quirindi or the surrounding communities of Werris Creek, Wallabadah and Willow Tree, pop in to the Ray White office on George Street, Quirindi, or give us a call on (02) 6746 1270. Our friendly team is always here to help and offer expert advice.